IT’S TIME….. IT’S TIME!!!! Sign up now to secure your spot!!!!

Round 2 of my exclusive boot camp program is geared up and ready to go! Make sure you sign up and reserve your spot. Spots are filling up fast.

Round 2 of Coachabc’s GetFitNow Bootcamp….

Are you ready?

Yep that’s right…

The next round of Coachabc’s Fall Bootcamp will begin: Thursday, September 28, 2017

Location is below:

Lewis and Joan Platt East Palo Alto Family YMCA (Grassy Area next to gym)

550 Bell St, East Palo Alto, CA 94303

As a bonus all participants will receive a free unisex “CoachABC Boot Camp” shirt and you are encouraged to wear it for camp.

You can choose from a black shirt or purple shirt.

This session of Coach ABC’s 6 week boot camp will be held from Thursday, September 28, 2017 – November 9, 2017.

The camp will be held twice per week on Thursday evening and Saturday morning.

Thursday class is 6:30pm-7:30pm.

Saturday class is 9:15-10:15am. 

Registration is open NOW and will close at 11:59 PM PST on Monday, September 18, 2017…..

This session will bring bigger challenges for greater results. With round 2 you will have access to the closed private Facebook accountability Group. Here you will be able to post pictures, receive nutritional ideas, motivational messages, and much more.

Soooo don’t wait, mark your calendars and don’t forget to sign up at coachabc1.com

 

Here is a little bit of what people are saying about Coachabc’s boot camp…

 

“I learned the importance of eating clean…..”

 

“I gained a sisterhood connection……”

 

“The ladies encouraged me when I didn’t think I could do it….”

 

“Coach challenged us, but it was to our own limitations……”

 

What will you say? Let me challenge you!!!!

 

Wellness Wednesday Tip!!!! Fighting inflammation with food!

Are you one of those that deal with inflammation issues from time to time, well if so, here are a few foods that you should consider adding to your diet.

Healthy herbs and spices:
Herbs and spices like turmeric, garlic, ginger and cinnamon enhance flavor and are powerful, natural anti-inflammatory agents.

Lean Protein:
Fish and seafood (salmon, sea bass, steelhead, black cod) and other healthy proteins (eggs. grass-fed meats, skinless poultry) are rich in omega-3 fats that act to lower levels of cholesterol.

Whole Grains:
Grains like brown rice, basmati rice, buckwheat, and quinoa digest slowly, reducing frequency of spikes in blood sugar that promote inflammation.
Fruits & Vegetables:
Vegetables (spinach, kale, Brussels sprouts, cauliflower, carrots, beets, peas, squash) and fruits (raspberries, blueberries, strawberries, peaches, pink grapefruit, pomegranates, and blackberries) are all rich in flavonoids and carotenoids with both antioxidant and anit-inflammatory activity.

Disclaimer:
If you are currently taking medication for any of the above noted issues, please consult your doctor before adding these items to your current regimen.

Wellness Wednesday Tip!!!! Protein bars…. Do you know what to look for?

Look at Carbs to Protein ratio

        OK, first thing’s first. If it’s a “protein” bar, it should have at least 15 grams of protein per bar. Less than that and you really aren’t getting much bang for your buck. Also, you want be sure the protein content is higher than carbs. Remember, the protein content is what makes a protein bar a “protein bar.” So if there are more grams of carbs than protein, or even worse, more grams of sugar than protein, you’ll definitely need to upgrade.

Look at the source of protein

            Choose bars that contain high-quality sources of protein, such as hydrolyzed whey, whey isolates and micellar casein. Whey or soy concentrates are fine but not the best. Also, gelatin (or collagen) is often added to protein bars to improve texture. You will find the protein type or types in the ingredients, from highest to lowest concentration. So check the ingredients and ensure that proteins such as hydrolyzed whey, whey isolates and micellar casein are high up on the ingredients list. Everything else is going to be suboptimal, and as a result, should not be listed high up on the ingredients.

Look at sugar

            Bottom line: Too much sugar in your diet will make you fat. And ironically enough, many protein bars are loaded with sugar. So avoid protein bars that contain refined sugars, such as sucrose, corn syrup, and high-fructose corn syrup in the ingredients. These types of ingredients will make your protein bar no better than a candy bar.

Next let’s talk a bit about artificial sweeteners and sugar alcohols. To make a protein taste good (because plain protein actually tastes pretty nasty), manufacturers often add things like artificial sweeteners (i.e. Sucralose) and sugar alcohols (i.e. xylitol, maltitol and sorbitol, also found in gum). Sugar alcohols will be listed along with sugars and dietary fiber under the Total Carbohydrate section on the nutrition label. Sugar alcohols have gained popularity as sweeteners because they have fewer calories, don’t affect blood sugar as much as sugar, and also don’t cause tooth decay. However sugar alcohols do have a downside because they may cause bloating and intestinal discomfort in some people. Also, because sugar alcohols do contribute calories and affect blood-sugar levels to variable degrees, they will need to be accounted for by the low-carb dieter.

Here’s my stance when it comes to sugar (artificial, alcohol or otherwise): If you have a lot of weight to lose, I’d stick to protein bars with no more than 6g net carbs per serving. Net carbs are your total carbs minus fiber. The only exception to this is if you’re using the bar immediately after a workout. In this case you can allow more carbs since your muscles will be more primed to absorb and burn those carbs quickly.

Look at fat

            It’s a good idea to find a bar that does contain some fat since this will slow digestion and the release of the carbs into the blood stream. However you want to avoid any bar that contains trans-fat, and watch out for bars with palm oil and palm kernel oil- which are types of saturated fats. Note: Not all saturated fats are associated with an increased risk of heart disease, but palm oil is.

Look at fiber

            Look for bars that contain at least 6 grams of fiber. Fiber will help promote regularity, control blood sugar spikes, and help you feel full longer.

Look at total calories relative to the size of the bar

            Last but not least, if you’re restricting daily calorie intake as a means to lose weight, downing a tiny sized, high calorie calorie protein bar isn’t exactly going to make fat loss easy. Think about it, you could be consuming a chunk of your total daily calories in just 1 protein bar that may not even fill you up for a few hours. So pay attention to the total calories of your bar, as well as the overall size of your protein bar.

The choices that coachabc uses are Kind Bars, and Power Crunch bars (chocolate mint is her favorite)